Audacious change

Idealog's February theme is audacious change. This month, we're putting the spotlight on individuals and companies trying to make a meaningful difference in the world, solve a key problem and revamp their practices and models due to consumers becoming increasingly disillusioned with the negative effects politics and economics are having on social issues.

Audacious change

Audacious change

One of Aotearoa's biggest companies, Spark, is a firm supporter of the LGBTQI+ community through its annual Pride advertising campaigns, its partnership with charity Outline, and its diversity and inclusion values within the company. Head of brand at Spark New Zealand Sarah Williams explains why the company chose to champion this social issue, how these campaigns attract both the loudest praise and the greatest vilification from New Zealanders, and why that it makes it the most important cause the company champions.

Audacious change

In an era where large-scale action is needed to address the looming environmental, social and economic challenges, business represents the single most potent, organised force for change on earth. This is the belief of Tickled Pink's Jerry Beale, who is a former social and cultural strategist at agency True and spearheads a business that helps to boost New Zealand companies' bottom line performance and staff engagement by helping them increase employee happiness, find their purpose and strengthen their workplace culture. Here, he has a chat about why we will see more brands like Patagonia that donate US$10 million to fight climate change, why business has become a forceful movement for change and how New Zealand businesses are doing when it comes to embracing audacious change.

Audacious change

Our farming systems stand on the precipice of intense change. The task of how to feed a growing population that is set to reach 10 billion people by 2050 in the face of climate change, resource scarcity, and land degradation has forced innovation to spur. Scientists and technologists have blown the whistle on traditional farming methods and subsequently, new systems of agriculture have emerged. Plant-based meats have sprouted, cellular agriculture and alternative protein products have spread across supermarkets and fast food joints, and farmers have more environmental accountability. Thankfully, strides in technological development have opened the gates for a fourth agricultural revolution, but will New Zealand – with its national identity that’s deeply entrenched in traditional farming methods – be willing to move with it? In part three of a series, Findlay Buchanan talks to one of the pioneers growing the pastures of agricultural posterity.

Up in smoke

Philip Morris – the largest tobacco company in the world – has declared it will transform the tobacco industry in support of New Zealand's Smokefree 2025 initiative. In time, it plans to stub out its cigarette range – which includes Marlboro, Parliament and Virginia S and move towards a future of fruity, trendy vapes and e-cigarettes. It’s a tactical maneuver from the giant cigarette corporate as alternative cigarettes slowly receive validation by scientists, governments, and consumers – but is the move really a ploy for Smokefree 2025, or more of a smoke screen by Philip Morris? And in the midst of all this, has its sudden departure from cigarettes led to a branding identity crisis? We speak to the managing director, James Williams, who explains the company's foray into the smoke-free market.

Audacious change

Our farming systems stand on the precipice of intense change. The task of how to feed a growing population that is set to reach 10 billion people by 2050 in the face of climate change, resource scarcity, and land degradation has forced innovation to spur. Scientists and technologists have blown the whistle on traditional farming methods and subsequently, new systems of agriculture have emerged. Plant-based meats have sprouted, cellular agriculture and alternative protein products have spread across supermarkets and fast food joints, and farmers have more environmental accountability. Thankfully, strides in technological development have opened the gates for a fourth agricultural revolution, but will New Zealand – with its national identity that’s deeply entrenched in traditional farming methods – be willing to move with it? In part two of a series, Findlay Buchanan talks to one of the pioneers growing the pastures of agricultural posterity.

Opinion

For the month of February, Idealog is honouring the brave souls who are using business as means to not only achieve commercial success, but to make a meaningful difference in the world, solve a key problem and set the social, cultural and ethical agenda for consumers – in other words, by creating audacious change. Here, editor Elly Strang explains why brand purpose has quickly become one of the most important discussions for businesses in 2019 – and how to avoid missing the mark, or 'woke washing'.

Bold ideas

The statistics don’t lie: the bulk of the those that are designing living and urban spaces in New Zealand cities are men – but the times are changing. Globally, there is a conversation taking place on what cities would look like if equal weighting was given to all of its citizens in the design process. Co-founder of Women in Urbanism, a New Zealand organisation formed to push for more feminist cities, Emma McInnes makes a case for how New Zealand’s cities can be made to be more inclusive through urban design.

The future of farming

Our farming systems stand on the precipice of intense change. The task of how to feed a growing population that is set to reach 10 billion people by 2050 in the face of climate change, resource scarcity, and land degradation has forced innovation to spur. Scientists and technologists have blown the whistle on traditional farming methods and subsequently, new systems of agriculture have emerged. Plant-based meats have sprouted, cellular agriculture and alternative protein products have spread across supermarkets and fast food joints, and farmers have more environmental accountability. Thankfully, strides in technological development have opened the gates for a fourth agricultural revolution, but will New Zealand – with its national identity that’s deeply entrenched in traditional farming methods – be willing to move with it? In part one of a series, Findlay Buchanan talks to Hikurangi Enterprises, one of the companies growing the pastures of agricultural posterity.

Social data for our cities

Auckland is in a time of change. Projects based on the Auckland Plan 2050 are being proposed, Kiwibuild is in the works, and further transformations are afoot in council board rooms. Each will change the physical spaces of Auckland city, but more importantly, the projects will transform the lives of those that live in them. Last week, Radio New Zealand surfaced a key issue: that despite living in a multicultural city, Pākehā men have by far the loudest voice when it comes to shaping Auckland's future. It further exposed a disconnect between those carving our city's future and the public who occupies it. So what are some ways we can invite the public into the urban planning process? One Australian start-up hoping to solve this issue is Neighbourlytics, which uses social data to gauge public interaction in public places. We chatted with founder Jessica Christiansen-Franks at the MYOB tech start-up conference in Melbourne.